Friday, February 27, 2015

Impact of using DSM‐5 criteria for diagnosing binge eating disorder in bariatric surgery candidates: Change in prevalence rate, demographic characteristics, and scores on the minnesota multiphasic personality inventory – 2 restructured form (MMPI‐2‐RF)

http://bit.ly/1369wVM

MedWorm: Binge Eating Disorder

Impact of using DSM‐5 criteria for diagnosing binge eating disorder in bariatric surgery candidates: Change in prevalence rate, demographic characteristics, and scores on the minnesota multiphasic personality inventory – 2 restructured form (MMPI‐2‐RF)

DiscussionAn additional 3.43% (p < .001) of bariatric surgery candidates met the diagnostic threshold for BED when using DSM‐5 criteria. These individuals were demographical similar and produced similar MMPI‐2‐RF and BES scores when compared with patients who met DSM‐IV‐TR criteria for BED. Thus, the current investigation indicates that individuals meeting BED criteria based on DSM‐5 are similar to those meeting the more conservative diagnostic threshold outlined in DSM‐IV‐TR in a sample of bariatric surgery candidates. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2014) (Source: International Journal of Eating Disorders)




Boise Bipolar Center, Charles K. Bunch, Ph.D, Boise Idaho Therapist Mental health photo 2168_zps680c452f.jpg

GOP states revisit Obamacare as Supreme Court weighs subsidies

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Health & Science: Science News, Health News, Scientific Developments, Healthcare & Nutrition - The Washington Post

GOP states revisit Obamacare as Supreme Court weighs subsidies

Officials in several Republican states that balked at participating in President Obama’s health-care initiative are now revisiting the issue, amid mounting panic over a possible Supreme Court decision that would revoke federal insurance subsidies for millions of Americans. Read full article >>









Weird News - The Huffington Post

You Are So Ready For Skateboarders Jumping Human Ramps

Give dudes some plywood and fellow dudes willing to hold the plywood from underneath, and you got yourself one nutty skateboard video.



Watch these skateboarders jump on and off human-supported ramps with the greatest of ease -- and without.



And don't get us started on the guy jumping from a tree branch ...



skateboard



But at least it didn't end like this human ramp exhibition:



funny gifs

via gifbin



As always, be careful out there -- and really, don't try this at home.



H/T Pixable


The Internet Just Served Up Some Weird Stuff, So Here Are Some Joe Biden Photos To Cleanse Your Palate

The last 24 hours of the Internet have been pretty weird. First we all stopped to watch a live llama chase, and then there was that argument over the color of a dress. (It's blue and black, by the way.)



Because we could all use a reset, here are some classic photos of Vice President Joe Biden being himself, doing his thing, keeping it real:





Artist Challenges Selfie Stick Ban By Taking A Bunch Of Selfies

Museums all over the world are working to ban the beloved selfie stick, but Australian artist Jesse Willesee isn't having it.



As a conceptual artist, Willesee is all about the selfie stick, which attaches to cameras and makes it possible to take selfies from a distance greater than arm's length.



"Anything that helps you document the world is a positive thing," he told The Huffington Post. So Willesee "stormed" the Museum of Contemporary Art in Australia and took a bunch of selfie stick photos for a project titled "Andy Warhol With Better Features."



andy warhol with better features 1



Willesee shot the project in collaboration with photographer Valentina Penkova. His intent is to highlight the world's interest in selfies and the idea that we now use other people's art as the backdrop for our own.



“People were taking photos of Valentina taking photos of me while I was taking photos of myself,” Willesee said in a press release. “No one was looking at the art."



andy warhol with better features



Although museum staff reportedly told Willesee that his project would "detract from the others' viewing experience," he did it anyway.



"I went in anyway and shot without their permission. And for most of the people there at the time, I was the most interesting viewing experience they were having," he told HuffPost. "After I started posing with the artworks, people wanted to pose with me. Galleries don’t accept that that’s the kind of experience audiences want to have. They have an old-fashioned solemn, contemplative viewing experience in mind when people want to interact and jump into the picture. Let the people take photos!"



selfie stick 3



So, why Warhol? Willesee told HuffPost that Warhol would have been a fan of the selfie stick.



"It seems like something he could have invented himself. So the title is a play on words with his name and the line from Jay Z's 'Picasso Baby,' where he says 'sleeping every night next to Mona Lisa, the modern day version with better features.' The idea of him taking Beyonce and mythologizing her against the Mona Lisa reminded me of how people want to mythologize themselves with great artworks."



selfie stick 4



H/T Artdaily


#TheDress Was Actually A Mother-Of-The-Bride Dress (And P.S. It's Black And Blue)

Turns out, the black and blue (or, perhaps, white and gold) dress that has undoubtedly taken over your newsfeed in the last 24 hours actually began as one woman's mother-of-the-bride dress.



The viral dress belongs to a British mother named Cecilia Bleasdale. She wore it to daughter Grace Johnston's wedding earlier this month, according to the Daily Mail.



thedress



It all started when Bleasdale sent a photo of the dress, purchased at U.K. retailer Roman Originals, to the bride and later to her other daughter, Angie McPhee.



"Mum sent it to Grace to give the dress a thumbs up or thumbs down," McPhee told the Daily Mail. "It was sent originally to my sister, then my mum sent the picture to me, and Grace said, 'Why is she wearing white and gold to the wedding?' We were shocked my mum had chosen a light-colored dress."



http://swiked.tumblr.com/post/112166688660/bellasfault-swiked-katze-geht-meow






According to Business Insider, Johnston and her then-fiancé also disagreed about the color of the dress, so they posted a photo of it to Facebook where the debate continued. That's when friend and 21-year-old Scottish folk singer Caitlin McNeill, who performed at the wedding, shared it to a Tumblr fan page dedicated to talent manager Sarah Weichel. From there, the debate just exploded -- with celebrities such as Taylor Swift, Kim Kardashian, Mindy Kaling and Julianne Moore chiming in.



As we're sure you know by now, the dress is officially black and blue, as confirmed by Roman Originals. The reason so many people saw it as white and gold is likely because of a phenomenon called color constancy, as explained by this video from AsapSCIENCE.



"People who picture the dress as white have brains who may be interpreting the dress in a blue-lit room, for example -- as in it's near a window with a bright blue sky," the narrator states. "It makes perfect sense then that the white dress would be tinted blue and that the gold color wouldn't really change. On the other hand, the brains of people who see it as black and blue may be interpreting the dress in an artificially lit setting, like somewhere with yellow lights. As a result, the brain sees the gold as just a reflection off of the black and believes the blue has been unaffected."






Health News Headlines - Yahoo News

Novartis treatment for vision loss meets goals in study

Swiss drugmaker Novartis said on Friday its treatment for a leading cause of age-related blindness had met its primary goals in a study and could potentially pave the way for less frequent dosing compared to a drug already on the market. Developed by Novartis's eyecare unit Alcon, the RTH258 drug is intended to treat wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which causes severe loss of vision in the over 50s and occurs when the center of the retina, or macula, deteriorates. Novartis said RTH258 demonstrated promising improvements in vision in the Phase II study that were as good as the popular treatment Eylea, produced by drugmakers Regeneron in the United States and Bayer elsewhere. Patients treated every three months with RTH258 experienced prolonged effects of the treatment, which could potentially reduce the treatment burden, Novartis said, adding Alcon had started a late-stage Phase III trial of the drug.



Health and Fitness - The Huffington Post

More American Children Are Doing Yoga Than Ever Before


By Ronnie Cohen

(Reuters Health) - A growing number of American children are bending into downward dog and other yoga poses, according to a new report on complementary health practices.


The report analyzed National Health Interview Survey data on practices outside of mainstream medicine and found significantly more kids and teens practicing yoga, tai chi and qi gong in 2012 than in 2007.

The study also showed a significant increase in the number of children using melatonin supplements as sleep aids. Melatonin is a natural hormone known to play a role in sleep.

Yoga originated in India more than 5,000 years ago, and the mind-body practice has become so popular in the west that yoga studios are as common in parts of California as Starbucks coffeehouses.

The new study, published in National Health Statistics Reports, included 17,321 interviews with adults about their 4- to 17-year-olds.

Overall, 3.1 percent of kids did yoga in 2012, up from 2.3 percent in 2007.

Industry data shows a nearly 8 percent increase in the number of yoga instructors during the same five years, the study authors write. In addition, they say, public schools are beginning to incorporate yoga - which fosters stretching, relaxing and developing strength - into fitness programs.

The increase in children's use of yoga and melatonin was a surprise to Dr. Josephine Briggs, director of the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH).

"The changes in the yoga category are very large," she told Reuters Health. "I was also struck by the use of melatonin in children."

In 2007, an estimated 1.3 million children did yoga, tai chi or qi gong, senior author Richard Nahin said at a news conference. The number grew to 1.9 million children in 2012, he said.

Researchers included the Chinese practices of tai chi and qi gong in the analysis because they are also mind-body practices, and their inclusion bolstered the sample sizes and the statistical power of the findings.

Girls were four times more likely to practice yoga, tai chi or qi gong in the prior year than boys, the study found.

Use of melatonin increased 700 percent, from 0.1 percent to 0.7 percent of children, between 2007 and 2012, Nahin said.

Briggs said she knew of no safety issues regarding melatonin for children. Rising use of the supplements may reflect burgeoning concern over use of benzodiazepines, a class of sedatives and anti-anxiety drugs prescribed for sleep problems, she said.

"Use of conventional sleeping pills, like benzodiazepines, is of some concern," she said. "Melatonin is a product that has a good safety profile."

Nonetheless, Briggs advises parents to discuss the use of yoga, melatonin and any health practices with their pediatricians.

In addition to yoga and melatonin, researchers looked at dietary supplements other than vitamins and minerals as well as chiropractic or osteopathic manipulation, meditation, acupuncture, massage, homeopathy and biofeedback.

Children with private health insurance were more likely to use chiropractic or osteopathic manipulation than children with public coverage. In 2012, children whose parents had more than a high school education were seven times more likely to use a complementary health approach as children whose parents had not completed high school, the study found.

The results don't explain why a higher level of parental education led to more complementary health practices for children, Nahin told Reuters Health. But, he said, more educated parents might be better equipped to identify complementary approaches and practitioners.

Wendy Weber, NCCIH branch chief for clinical research, said complementary medicine holds "some areas of great promise." In particular, she cited probiotics and mindfulness-based stress reduction.

During the news conference, Weber advised parents to ask their teenagers about weight-loss and sports-enhancement products and to keep in mind that children are not just small adults.

"While most of the body-mind approaches seem relatively safe, we don't know if they're appropriate for all children," she said. "Just because it's something natural, doesn't mean that it's always safe to use."

She urged parents to consult healthcare professionals whenever children show symptoms.

"It's extremely important not to delay treatment with a known, proven therapy," she said.

SOURCE: http://1.usa.gov/1BvgHci National Health Statistics Reports, February 10, 2015.




Boise Bipolar Center, Charles K. Bunch, Ph.D, Boise Idaho Therapist Mental health photo 2168_zps680c452f.jpg

Impact of using DSM‐5 criteria for diagnosing binge eating disorder in bariatric surgery candidates: Change in prevalence rate, demographic characteristics, and scores on the minnesota multiphasic personality inventory – 2 restructured form (MMPI‐2‐RF)

http://bit.ly/1369wVM

MedWorm: Binge Eating Disorder

Impact of using DSM‐5 criteria for diagnosing binge eating disorder in bariatric surgery candidates: Change in prevalence rate, demographic characteristics, and scores on the minnesota multiphasic personality inventory – 2 restructured form (MMPI‐2‐RF)

DiscussionAn additional 3.43% (p < .001) of bariatric surgery candidates met the diagnostic threshold for BED when using DSM‐5 criteria. These individuals were demographical similar and produced similar MMPI‐2‐RF and BES scores when compared with patients who met DSM‐IV‐TR criteria for BED. Thus, the current investigation indicates that individuals meeting BED criteria based on DSM‐5 are similar to those meeting the more conservative diagnostic threshold outlined in DSM‐IV‐TR in a sample of bariatric surgery candidates. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2014) (Source: International Journal of Eating Disorders)




Boise Bipolar Center, Charles K. Bunch, Ph.D, Boise Idaho Therapist Mental health photo 2168_zps680c452f.jpg

Impact of using DSM‐5 criteria for diagnosing binge eating disorder in bariatric surgery candidates: Change in prevalence rate, demographic characteristics, and scores on the minnesota multiphasic personality inventory – 2 restructured form (MMPI‐2‐RF)

http://bit.ly/1369wVM

MedWorm: Binge Eating Disorder

Impact of using DSM‐5 criteria for diagnosing binge eating disorder in bariatric surgery candidates: Change in prevalence rate, demographic characteristics, and scores on the minnesota multiphasic personality inventory – 2 restructured form (MMPI‐2‐RF)

DiscussionAn additional 3.43% (p < .001) of bariatric surgery candidates met the diagnostic threshold for BED when using DSM‐5 criteria. These individuals were demographical similar and produced similar MMPI‐2‐RF and BES scores when compared with patients who met DSM‐IV‐TR criteria for BED. Thus, the current investigation indicates that individuals meeting BED criteria based on DSM‐5 are similar to those meeting the more conservative diagnostic threshold outlined in DSM‐IV‐TR in a sample of bariatric surgery candidates. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2014) (Source: International Journal of Eating Disorders)




Boise Bipolar Center, Charles K. Bunch, Ph.D, Boise Idaho Therapist Mental health photo 2168_zps680c452f.jpg

Bayer crown prince vows independence for diversified drugmaker

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Health News Headlines - Yahoo News

Bayer crown prince vows independence for diversified drugmaker

Bayer CFO Baumann poses during a news conference in LeverkusenBy Ludwig Burger LEVERKUSEN, Germany (Reuters) - Werner Baumann, seen as heir apparent to Bayer Chief Executive Marijn Dekkers, says he will fight for the independence of Germany's largest drugmaker after the spin-off of its plastics unit. "We will always try anew every day to defend our independence through our performance and the decisions that we make," said the 52-year-old, who will head Bayer's main healthcare arm from April. In an interview with Reuters, Baumann said Bayer did not need a merger to make it more successful, even if there were few synergies between the healthcare, veterinary drugs and crop protection businesses.




Study on biology of chronic fatigue illness stirs debate

By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - A team of scientists said on Friday they had found "robust evidence" that a condition called Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is a biological as opposed to a psychological disorder, but some experts questioned the findings. The team from Columbia University in the United States identified in their research distinct immune changes in patients with CFS -- markers they said pointed to distinct disease stages and would lead to better diagnosis and treatment. Many sufferers say they think their illness started after a viral infection. Recent research showing psychological treatments such as cognitive behavior therapy can help CFS sufferers become more active have also caused argument, with some patients complaining such results suggest they are just lazy or suffering from a condition that is all in the mind.



Weird News - The Huffington Post

Head Transplants Are Coming Soon, At Least If This Doctor Gets His Way

Things didn't go so great for Victor Frankenstein or his monster, but don't tell that to Sergio Canavero.



The Italian doctor believes that it's now possible to slice the head of off one person, stitch it to the decapitated body of another, and then reanimate the two-human mash-up. What's more, he says the first head transplant operation could come in two years, New Scientist reported.



The goal of such an audacious operation would be to extend the lives of people whose bodies were too diseased or injured to keep the head alive. As Canavero told The Huffington Post in an email, "Go to any neurology ward, ask to see someone with muscle-wasting disorders, and the answer [as to why the surgery makes sense] will be crystal clear."



That sounds simple enough, if perhaps a bit ghoulish. But not everyone is convinced that head transplantation is medically feasible or ethically sound. And then there's the high cost of the head-swapping surgery--Canavero's best guess is $13 million a pop.



Canavero, of Turin Advanced Neuromodulation Group, first proposed the idea for head transplantation in 2013. Now, in a new paper published Feb. 3, 2015 in the journal Surgical Neurological International, he outlines the surgical techniques that he believes will move head transplants from the realm of science fiction to medical fact.



These range from cooling the head and donor body to prevent cell death to using a super-sharp blade to cut the spinal cords very cleanly so that the nerve fibers are better able to fuse. Following the surgery, the patient would be kept in a coma for weeks in order to prevent movement that might interfere with healing.



"The greatest technical hurdle to such endeavor is of course the reconnection of the donor's and recipient's spinal cords," Dr. Canavero wrote in 2013. "It is my contention that the technology only now exists for such linkage."



If Canavero sounds confident about head transplants, other medical experts think the good doctor is headed in the wrong direction.



"This is such an overwhelming project, the possibility of it happening is very unlikely," Dr. Harry Goldsmith, a clinical professor of neurological surgery at the University of California, Davis, told New Scientist. "I don't believe it will ever work, there are too many problems with the procedure."



Dr. Arthur Caplan, a bioethicist at New York University, offered a similarly blunt assessment.



"To move a head on to someone else's body requires the rewiring of the spinal cord," Caplan wrote in an article for Forbes. "We don't know how to do that. If we did there would be far fewer spinal cord injuries. Nor, despite Canavero's assertions to the contrary, is medicine anywhere close to knowing how to use stem cells or growth factors to make this happen."



But Canavero is counting on bringing others into the fold, telling New Scientist that "before going to the moon, you want to make sure people will follow you."



Followers may be one thing Canavero can count on. He told the magazine that several people had already expressed interest in a new body.



No word yet as to how many people have expressed interest in a new head.


#TheDress Sparked A Huge Debate, But Science Is Here To Settle Things

What color is it?



That question had just about everyone with a social media account scratching their heads on Thursday, when 21-year-old Scottish folk singer Caitlin McNeill posted a photo of a dress on Tumblr.



"Me and my friends can’t agree and we are freaking the f*ck out," McNeil wrote in the photo's caption--and they weren't the only ones who couldn't. Some people saw the dress as white and gold, while others say it as blue and black.



The dress really is blue and black, so why do some perfectly sane people see it as white and gold? Here comes the science.



(Story continues below image.)

the dress blue and black

In the middle, the original photo of the dress. The photo on the left has been color-corrected as if the dress were white. The photo on the right has been color-corrected to blue-black.



"It's a phenomenon known as color constancy," Mitchell Moffitt, co-creator of the YouTube series ASAPScience, says in a new video (above). "People who picture the dress as white have brains who may be interpreting the dress in a blue-lit room for example... It makes perfect sense then that the white dress would be tinted blue and that the gold color wouldn't really change."



In other words, our brains automatically adjust our color perception depending on the context in which something is viewed.



Mystery solved.



GPS for the Soul - The Huffington Post

Work Smarter, Not Harder by Breaking Your Counterproductive Bad Habits

There's a lot to be said for focusing on your strengths. After all, those things you do well set you apart and help you stand out in a competitive environment. But, the idea that you should "play to your strengths and ignore your weaknesses" can be the biggest obstacle to reaching your greatest potential.



While ignoring your bad habits may help you feel good initially, that avoidance will eventually catch up to you. When you don't address the unproductive and unhealthy things you're doing alongside your good habits, you'll stagnate. Despite your best efforts and hard work, those few little bad habits will hold you back in a big way.



Bad habits aren't just about smoking or late night cookie binges. Bad habits can include a variety of cognitive, emotional, and behavioral pitfalls. While some people avoid change and struggle with self-pity, others resent other people's success and don't learn from their mistakes. We're all prone to pitfalls that can hold us back unless we're open to acknowledging and changing our habits.



Avoid Inadvertent Self-Sabotage



Engaging in good habits 90 percent of the time, while indulging in bad habits 10 percent of time, places you at risk of being like a hamster running in a wheel. Despite all the energy you're exerting, you won't move forward. You'll never be able to outrun your bad habits. Instead, you'll simply exhaust yourself and begin to question yourself when you aren't growing and reaching new heights of success.



Imagine a person who goes to the gym every day and works out for two hours. He prides himself on the fact that he sticks to his schedule, even on the days when he doesn't feel like exercising. He works hard, and feels pleased that for the first time in his life, he's finally committed to getting healthy.



But, after a few months, he's not seeing the results he'd hoped for. He begins to wonder if there's something wrong with his metabolism and at times, he assumes his body just wasn't meant to change. After all, he's putting in a lot of work to get in shape.



Despite his hard work, however, he doesn't change his eating habits. In fact, he rewards himself for working out by stopping at the drive-thru on his way home from the gym. He figures he deserves a treat and he enjoys a burger, fries, and a shake as a late night snack. He's so focused on what he's doing well -- going to the gym -- that he overlooks the fact that his eating habits are completely undermining his efforts.



Although that example seems somewhat ridiculous, that's exactly what many of us do in our everyday lives. We focus so much on all the things we're doing right, that we overlook all the ways in which we inadvertently sabotage our best efforts.



Until you acknowledge what you're doing to hold yourself back from becoming your best, following advice like, "focus on your strengths" and "look at the positive," won't take you to the next level. Becoming better requires you to address your counterproductive bad habits.



Work Smarter, Not Harder



Time and energy are finite. You only have so many hours in a day and so many days of your life. The solution to using your time wisely isn't about exerting more energy -- eventually you'll run out of steam. The key to reaching your greatest potential is about working smarter, not harder.



Working smarter, however, requires you to address those bad habits that are holding you back. Acknowledging the unproductive thoughts and ineffective behavior that you've tried to ignore can be uncomfortable. But, stepping out of your comfort zone and choosing to proactively address bad habits will skyrocket your ability to create long-lasting change.



Just like a chain is only as strong as its weakest link, we're only as good as our worst habits. Strengthening our weakest areas is the most powerful way to begin reaching our greatest potential. Letting go of the things that hold you back will propel you forward.



Amy Morin is an internationally recognized expert on mental strength and the author of 13 Things Mentally Strong People Don't Do.



Good News - The Huffington Post

21 Glorious Vintage Photos Of Kids Having Fun Before The Internet

Life before Snapchat and Candy Crush was clearly really boring. As this collection of vintage photos spanning from the 1800s to the 1970s shows, there was just nothing to do before we had an app for everything. Poor kids.







@media only screen and (min-width : 500px) {.ethanmobile { display: none; }}



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Boise Bipolar Center, Charles K. Bunch, Ph.D, Boise Idaho Therapist Mental health photo 2168_zps680c452f.jpg

Champions For Change: Meet The Champions -- Part 2

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Health News Headlines - Yahoo News

Champions For Change: Meet The Champions -- Part 2

Champions For Change: Meet The Champions -- Part 2Champions for Change (C4C) is pleased to continue our 'Meet the Champions' Series. This bi-monthly blog series highlights the work of 24 Nigerian leaders currently participating as C4C champions. C4C's Champions in Nigeria are working together to save the lives of mothers, children and young women through innovative advocacy and leadership...






Boise Bipolar Center, Charles K. Bunch, Ph.D, Boise Idaho Therapist Mental health photo 2168_zps680c452f.jpg

Impact of using DSM‐5 criteria for diagnosing binge eating disorder in bariatric surgery candidates: Change in prevalence rate, demographic characteristics, and scores on the minnesota multiphasic personality inventory – 2 restructured form (MMPI‐2‐RF)

http://bit.ly/1369wVM

MedWorm: Binge Eating Disorder

Impact of using DSM‐5 criteria for diagnosing binge eating disorder in bariatric surgery candidates: Change in prevalence rate, demographic characteristics, and scores on the minnesota multiphasic personality inventory – 2 restructured form (MMPI‐2‐RF)

DiscussionAn additional 3.43% (p < .001) of bariatric surgery candidates met the diagnostic threshold for BED when using DSM‐5 criteria. These individuals were demographical similar and produced similar MMPI‐2‐RF and BES scores when compared with patients who met DSM‐IV‐TR criteria for BED. Thus, the current investigation indicates that individuals meeting BED criteria based on DSM‐5 are similar to those meeting the more conservative diagnostic threshold outlined in DSM‐IV‐TR in a sample of bariatric surgery candidates. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2014) (Source: International Journal of Eating Disorders)




Boise Bipolar Center, Charles K. Bunch, Ph.D, Boise Idaho Therapist Mental health photo 2168_zps680c452f.jpg

Impact of using DSM‐5 criteria for diagnosing binge eating disorder in bariatric surgery candidates: Change in prevalence rate, demographic characteristics, and scores on the minnesota multiphasic personality inventory – 2 restructured form (MMPI‐2‐RF)

http://bit.ly/1369wVM

MedWorm: Binge Eating Disorder

Impact of using DSM‐5 criteria for diagnosing binge eating disorder in bariatric surgery candidates: Change in prevalence rate, demographic characteristics, and scores on the minnesota multiphasic personality inventory – 2 restructured form (MMPI‐2‐RF)

DiscussionAn additional 3.43% (p < .001) of bariatric surgery candidates met the diagnostic threshold for BED when using DSM‐5 criteria. These individuals were demographical similar and produced similar MMPI‐2‐RF and BES scores when compared with patients who met DSM‐IV‐TR criteria for BED. Thus, the current investigation indicates that individuals meeting BED criteria based on DSM‐5 are similar to those meeting the more conservative diagnostic threshold outlined in DSM‐IV‐TR in a sample of bariatric surgery candidates. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2014) (Source: International Journal of Eating Disorders)




Boise Bipolar Center, Charles K. Bunch, Ph.D, Boise Idaho Therapist Mental health photo 2168_zps680c452f.jpg

Swine Flu Vaccines Spoiled By The Heat, According To Manufacturers

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Health and Fitness - The Huffington Post

Swine Flu Vaccines Spoiled By The Heat, According To Manufacturers

ATLANTA (AP) — The makers of the nasal spray version of the flu vaccine say now they know why it has failed to protect young U.S. children against swine flu — fragile doses got too warm.



The AstraZeneca FluMist vaccine works well for most flu strains, but small studies found it didn't work very well against the swine flu bug that first emerged in 2009. Swine flu has returned each year since but wasn't a big player this flu season.



The problem first came to light last year, when swine flu was behind most illnesses. At a medical meeting Thursday, company officials said they investigated and concluded that the swine flu part of the vaccine is unusually sensitive to heat.



Flu vaccine is refrigerated, but it is allowed to be out at room temperature for up to two hours during distribution. The doses out on hot days were least effective, and company officials say it's because they degraded and lost potency.



The company plans to use a more stable strain in the future.



FluMist is made using live but weakened virus, and is only approved for ages 2 to 49. Flu shots, made from killed virus, do not appear to be as vulnerable to heat, experts say.



In June, a federal scientific panel — the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices — took the unusual step of advising doctors to give FluMist to healthy young kids instead of a shot, if available. For years, studies have indicated the nasal spray is the better choice for young children because it prompts a stronger immune response in kids who have never been sick with the flu.



On Thursday, the panel rescinded its preference for FluMist.



Data presented to the panel on Thursday confirmed early indications that flu vaccines of all kinds, including FluMist, didn't work very well this winter. They were roughly 20 percent effective. This year's vaccines didn't include the exact strain that ended up making most people sick.





Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Federal Panel Resists Tearful Pleas For New Meningitis Vaccine Routine

ATLANTA (AP) — A federal panel on Thursday recommended that two new meningitis vaccines only be used for rare outbreaks, resisting tearful pleas to give it routinely to teens and college students.



The vaccines target B strain meningococcal disease, which comes on like the flu at first but can rapidly develop into dangerous meningitis or blood infections. But it is very rare and students already get another meningitis vaccine that protects against four more common strains.



So the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices declined to recommend routine shots for all adolescents and college students. The panel is to consider that later this year. It only recommended the vaccine be used in emergencies or for people at unusually high risk.



Before the unanimous vote, the committee heard pleas for broader support for the vaccine. With quivering voices and teary eyes, many told personal stories about the disease's personal impact. One woman, Patti Wukovits from New York's Long Island, said her 17-year-old daughter died in 2012, shortly before her high school graduation.



"We buried her in her prom dress," said Wukovits, a nurse. "Kimberly would be alive today if she'd had the opportunity to be protected by the B vaccines."



Meningococcal (mehn-ihn-joh-KAHK'-ul) disease is caused by a bacteria spread by coughing, sneezing and kissing, and most cases occur in previously healthy children and young adults. College dormitories are considered potential launching pads for outbreaks.



Even with antibiotic treatment, 10 to 15 percent of people who get it die, and about 15 percent of survivors have long-term disabilities, including loss of limbs or brain damage.



Illnesses caused by the B strain are very rare and have not been increasing, but the disease grabbed attention in 2013 with small outbreaks at Princeton University and the University of California, Santa Barbara. At that time, there was no B strain vaccine available in the U.S.; special permission was granted to bring it from Europe where it was approved for students at the two schools.



This year, there have been two outbreaks — at the University of Oregon and at Providence College in Rhode Island. In Oregon, one student died last week and three others were sickened.



The strain B vaccines for ages 10 to 25 were licensed in the U.S. in the past few months: Bexsero, by Novartis, was approved last month. It's given in two doses, at a retail price of $160 a dose. Pfizer's Trumenba was licensed in October. It's a three-dose series at $115 a shot.



The panel's advice — if adopted by the government — would influence doctor use of the new vaccines and insurance coverage.



Illnesses from the other four bacterial meningitis strains have fallen to historic lows, with fewer than a dozen cases reported each year. The vaccine against those strains is recommended for ages 11 through 18 years. It's standard for most kids entering college.



___



Online:



Vaccine panel: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/acip/





Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.



GPS for the Soul - The Huffington Post

The Greatest Luxury of All

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In the crush of our Information Overload Age, the greatest luxury isn't money.



It isn't fame.



It isn't even attention.



It's time.



When was the last time you took a walk in nature?



Curled up with a really good book?



Turned off your smart phone? (WHAT?!)



Take a few minutes today to unplug and unwind.



Yes, I mean literally unplug.



Turn off the TV, walk away from the Internet.



I'll bet you'll come away with more inspiring ideas in 30 minutes of relaxation than from 3 days of staring at your computer.



 



I believe in you!



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2013-12-16-1NoahStJohn.jpgNoah St. John is famous for inventing Afformations and helping busy entrepreneurs to accelerate income, boost self-confidence, and make success automatic.



His sought-after advice has been called the "secret sauce" for creating breakthrough performance.



Get Noah's new video training series How to Boost Income and Self-Confidence Using Power Habits ® FREE at www.PowerHabitsAcademy.com .



Inventor of Afformations; founder of Power Habits®PowerHabitsAcademy.com


Ensuring a Peaceful Death for a Loved One

Everywhere in the world, people say they wish to die peacefully. What they mean is, they do not want to die in a choppy manner; they want to recede gently. There are simple things that can be done for those who are nearing death. You can place a traditional oil lamp next to that person, burning constantly -- 24 hours a day. The lamp will create the right kind of atmosphere. If you are there, you will notice that it makes a difference, even if it is not dark. This comes from the understanding that when you light a lamp, it fills the room with a certain energy. This creates an aura so that the choppy nature of withdrawal can be regulated to some extent. The lamp should have a cotton wick and be filled with ghee (clarified butter), or butter if ghee is not available. These natural substances are used because they exude positivity.



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The second thing that can be done is to have a certain chant playing softly in the background. There are various universal chants that will ensure that the choppy withdrawal can be avoided. One that is available from our ashram is Brahmananda Swarupa. This is a consecrated chant, a certain amount of work has been done on it. The lamp and chant should continue up to 14 days after one has been certified dead, because that person may be medically dead but not existentially dead. Death happens slowly. The withdrawal of the life process from the body happens step-by-step. For all practical purposes, the activity of the lungs, heart and brain has stopped so a person is declared dead, but it is not yet so. Even if the person's body is burnt, he is still not dead because his movement into the other realm has not begun.







This is why in Indian culture, various rituals are conducted up to 14 days after someone dies. Unfortunately, the knowledge and power behind these rituals have mostly been lost, and people are just conducting them for their livelihood. Very few truly understand the significance. When someone is able to leave their body absolutely consciously, we do not do anything. But for all others, certain rituals are conducted because you have to show them the way.



When someone dies, the first thing that is done is to burn anything that has been in touch with their body, such as underclothes. Outer garments, jewelry, and other possessions are distributed to many people -- not just to one person -- within three days. Everything is distributed as quickly as possible. These things were done not only to settle the dead, but also to settle the family and relatives, so that they understand that it is over.



Everywhere in the world, death is held in a certain way, irrespective of culture. It is said, "Even if your enemy is dying right now, you must create an atmosphere for him to die peacefully. Do not do ugly things to this person." Maybe you shot him in battle, but you take off your hat when he is dying or say a prayer. When someone is dying, at that moment the whistle has already been blown and the game is over. There is no point kicking now.



When you see the dead are not treated with respect, something within you shakes. Not because you have to treat a body with respect, but because he is exiting slowly. It does not matter how that person lived, at least his death must happen well. Every human being must have that much intention to allow others to die gracefully.



For Sadhguru's You Tube Channel visit here.



For more articles by Sadhguru visit here.



For more information about Sadhguru visit here.


A Letter to the New Big Sister

Dear Kennedy,



Things abruptly changed for you about six months ago when your little sister got out of mommy's belly and came home from the hospital with us. You were used to having mommy and daddy all to yourself. You and I spent all summer together. We went to the library, Chick-fil-A, played with friends and watched a little too much TV. It was a blast.



No matter the amount of talks and "big sister" books we read, it probably didn't prepare you for what was to come. All of a sudden, there was a tiny little baby in our house. The baby was loud -- probably much louder than you anticipated. The baby was always being held, and the baby always needed mommy.



If this upset you, it was hard to tell. You embody grace, especially for such a big girl who's 3 years old. Even though you showed a big interest in the baby, you continued your life as usual and you didn't seem to mind that the baby needed a lot of attention.



This had to be hard on you. I know it was. I know this because you had trouble in other areas, like using the potty. It was your one thing you could hold on to for control, and I guess I don't blame you. But, you never seemed jealous or upset with mommy and daddy.



I'm a big sister, too. Sometimes, there's a lot of pressure on us to set an example, not act like a baby and try new things to show that we are so big and so independent. Sometimes, we just have to be flexible, whether we like it or not. Sometimes, we get less attention and less praise. Big sisters have a tough job, but you were cut out for it. You've got this.



Now that your little sister has been with us for a little over six months, you use the potty like a big girl, and you are becoming so independent. The struggles you were having before seem to be no more. That doesn't mean life is easy from here on out, but I have a feeling you will handle those with that same grace.



Kennedy, you need to know that we are proud of you. I don't tell you this enough. You have a kind spirit, a hilarious sense of humor, a vocabulary that amazes me daily and the potential to be anything.



Most importantly, you have love. I realized this the other day when the first thing you asked from waking up from your nap was, "Where is Caroline?" Then later, you sat there and hugged her face with gusto (maybe a little too much gusto). And a little bit later, you found such joy feeding her puffs. Your little sister smiles from ear to ear when she sees your face, and always looks for you when she hears your voice. Even though I'm her mommy, I have a feeling that you're her favorite person.



Want to know why?



It's because of the love that radiates out of you. In the future, I know you will probably dislike her for taking your toys or borrowing your clothes. There may be some days or years that you aren't very good friends. But she's your sister. And this love right now? Promise me you'll always carry it in your heart.



Keep shining, sweet Kennedy. I adore you!



Love,



Mommy



2015-02-27-kc2.jpg





This post originally appeared on Meg O. on the Go. To keep up with Meg, you can follow her on Facebook or Instagram.




Boise Bipolar Center, Charles K. Bunch, Ph.D, Boise Idaho Therapist Mental health photo 2168_zps680c452f.jpg

Impact of using DSM‐5 criteria for diagnosing binge eating disorder in bariatric surgery candidates: Change in prevalence rate, demographic characteristics, and scores on the minnesota multiphasic personality inventory – 2 restructured form (MMPI‐2‐RF)

http://bit.ly/1369wVM

MedWorm: Binge Eating Disorder

Impact of using DSM‐5 criteria for diagnosing binge eating disorder in bariatric surgery candidates: Change in prevalence rate, demographic characteristics, and scores on the minnesota multiphasic personality inventory – 2 restructured form (MMPI‐2‐RF)

DiscussionAn additional 3.43% (p < .001) of bariatric surgery candidates met the diagnostic threshold for BED when using DSM‐5 criteria. These individuals were demographical similar and produced similar MMPI‐2‐RF and BES scores when compared with patients who met DSM‐IV‐TR criteria for BED. Thus, the current investigation indicates that individuals meeting BED criteria based on DSM‐5 are similar to those meeting the more conservative diagnostic threshold outlined in DSM‐IV‐TR in a sample of bariatric surgery candidates. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2014) (Source: International Journal of Eating Disorders)




Boise Bipolar Center, Charles K. Bunch, Ph.D, Boise Idaho Therapist Mental health photo 2168_zps680c452f.jpg

Celebrate International Polar Bear Day With These Stunning Photographs

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Good News - The Huffington Post

Celebrate International Polar Bear Day With These Stunning Photographs

Happy International Polar Bear Day!



This February 27 marks the 10th annual observance of the holiday. Popularized by conservation group Polar Bears International, the day is an opportunity to raise awareness for these iconic animals and the threats they face.



Arctic warming, made worse by greenhouse gas emissions from human activities, is one of the biggest threats to polar bears. A warmer Arctic means less sea ice for the bears to hunt seals on, reducing their access to food. More open water also means more drownings and reduced cub survival.



Scientists estimate there are 20,000 to 25,000 polar bears in the wild, mostly in Canada.



"While we have much we can do in the present to increase the resilience of polar bears in our lifetimes, their long term survival in anything like the abundance and distribution we know today requires global actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions," Geoff York, senior director of conservation at Polar Bears International, said in a statement to The Huffington Post.



"We are driving this threat, we can also drive the solutions needed to fix it," he said. "That will require all of us working together -- northerners and southerners, east and west, rural communities and urban centers. We all have a role to play, we can all be part of the solution."



Protecting polar bear populations and their habitats carries the added benefit of protecting human habitats as well. The Arctic plays a part in regulating the Earth's climate, according to NASA, and climate change in the Arctic is likely to have consequences elsewhere.



Below, check out 10 stunning polar bear photographs from National Geographic's Your Shot community, and remember that any day is a good day to care about polar bears. Learn more about what you can do for polar bears here.





Watch These Bolivian Grandmas Play A Mean Game Of Handball

When you think of the aches and pains that often accompany old age, you'd imagine women in their 70s and 80s taking it easy -- not playing a competitive sport. But that's what a group of grandmas and great-grandmas are doing in a Bolivian town, all while wearing skirts.



The Associated Press captured this amazing video of the grandmas at one of their weekly handball meets. From the video, handball appears to be something of a cross between soccer and basketball.



The women say handball actually helps their aches and pains subside, rather than aggravating them. "There are days my knees hurt from rheumatism, but when I play it goes away," 77-year-old Rosa Lima told The Associated Press.



Lima and the others are among the 1,000 seniors who play sports locally. Others have said it not only helps them stay active, but also maintain their weight.



And that's not the only benefit. The sport gives the women social interaction -- something so important for older people. Studies have shown that social interaction helps keep older adults mobile and their minds sharp. Activity also helps improve one's mood and reduces stress.



Well done, ladies!



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GPS for the Soul - The Huffington Post

When a Cold Isn't Just a Cold

The cough started just below my throat, at the top of my chest, late in the day. It hurt. By night, my throat started to ache and swell. By the next morning, my throat was inflamed and very painful. The third day I knew I was sick. The thing is, I get this almost annually. The timing of this, however, clued me in that something was amiss.



Sure, it is winter and illness abounds, but I had not been exposed to anyone who was sick. Further, no one around me was becoming ill, so I was obviously not contagious. I am a very healthy person. When I do get the occasional allergy or sore throat, it's done within a day or two.



When day three arrived and I was getting worse, I started self-evaluating. I was having an upper limit problem. Further, I knew this upper limit problem came directly from my fear of being seen.



We all have a happiness quotient in us and when we get close to the edge, we manufacture something to level us out. Some part of us is afraid of what will happen if we feel good, shine brightly, grow abundantly for an extended period of time. Though I had been working on the roots of my fear of being seen, I had suddenly become very visible on a week where I would have to show up fully, further increasing my visibility. I had far surpassed my happiness quotient and now I was sick.



Gay Hendricks writes in The Big Leap: Conquer Your Hidden Fear and Take Life to the Next Level that upper limit problems manifest commonly as:



worrying



blaming



criticism



getting sick



squabbling



hiding significant feelings



breaking agreements



not speaking significant truths to the relevant people, rather speaking it to everyone else deflecting compliments.



My sore throat and cough started the day after one of my most authentically written posts was published. I was proud and ecstatic. Then I started seeing the reviews and shares. What I had written resonated with readers. The number of views grew in the tens of thousands.



Meanwhile, I was preparing for my first paid speech. Though I had been booked for a couple of months, the irony had not yet occurred to me. Both of my parents works at hospitals while I was growing up. Both my parents and their counterparts had unhealthy lifestyles. I saw how it held them back, exhausted them, and negatively impacted their health. In many ways, this drove into a career in the wellness field. I wanted to help people live optimally, which includes taking accountability for lifestyle choices. My speech would be at a local hospital on the topic of self-care.



I remember the day I got sick, the number of views on the article peaked 50,000. I knew I was no longer a secret. Something big was about to break for me and the part of me that has hid behind the excuses and limitations in order to stay safe was not impressed. I lost my voice first. Then the cough set in fully, so bad at times that it literally gagged me. No medicines could ease it.



I was slated on this same week to teach an asana and a mediation practice to my cohorts in my advanced yoga teacher training. I wasn't worried about this. I am confident in my skills as a teacher. I was actually excited to be able to share my style with my cohorts. By class day, I recognized I was in an upper limit issue.



I had to show up, to give my best class that I could no matter how I felt. For my own good, I needed to break through this upper limit, otherwise I was going to repeat it over and over rather from an illness or some other manifestation. I showed up fully for my speech, too. I stepped into my zone of genius which is helping people be whole.



Breaking through upper limit problems require you to show up and keep showing up fully, no matter how scary or challenging it may be. When you become aware of hitting your upper limit, pivot. Be willing to look at the real issue. What could I do to expand my capacity for success, acceptance, love, and abundance?



Draw on previous experiences of how it felt to be in your zone of genius and really shine. Notice how that memory feels within your body and allow that feeling to expand. Ask yourself what steps you could take immediately to allow the positive energy to flow through your whole being again? Commit to taking inspired action and show up fully.



My pivot was giving myself permission to be supported. I drank in the feedback from my teaching and speech, which was all very positive. I allowed myself to be taken care of instead of being the one taking care of others. I slowed down significantly and listened to what my body needed to heal. Through the whole ordeal, I practiced a great deal of self-compassion, allowing myself to explore what would it mean to be fully seen.



I not only mentally and emotionally shifted, I physically shifted. I made a conscious decision that I am ready to be seen. I do not need an illness to be another excuse to hide behind. I want to see how much more greatness there is waiting on the other side of my limitations.



While I recognize that old habits can sometimes be hard to break, with this one, I am choosing for whatever replaces it to arrive with ease and joy. It is, after all, a choice I have the power to make. I know that the inspired action necessary s to keep showing up fully, each and ever moment. The choice itself is quite simple and I know grace will gift me with exactly what I need to continue to open up into my greatness.



Wendy Reese is a lifestyle strategist who specializes in whole being, author, host of The Whole Being Zone and yoga teacher with 13 years of teaching experience. Get regular Wendy Wisdom (and inspiration) on Twitter and Instagram @wholebeinginc



Weird News - The Huffington Post

Stolen Picasso Shipped As Christmas Present Seized In Newark

picasoo

The cubist painting La Coiffeuse by Pablo Picasso was considered missing for over a decade.

Photo: AP/US Department of Justice



This article originally appeared on artnet News.





A stolen Picasso painting which was considered lost for years has resurfaced in the United States, where it had been shipped under false pretenses as a $37 Christmas present labeled as “art craft." The 1911 painting, La Coiffeuse (The Hairdresser), was discovered in December in a FedEx shipment from Belgium to Long Island City.



The US attorney for the Eastern District of New York, Loretta Lynch, filed a civil forfeiture suit on Thursday, February 26 to return the painting to France. The work is owned by the French government.



The painting, worth millions of dollars, was stolen in Paris more than a decade ago, though the theft's exact date is unclear. It had been smuggled out of a storeroom at the Centre Georges Pompidou.



The canvas was last exhibited in Munich in 1998, and then returned to Paris, where it was placed in storage at the Paris museum. It wasn't until three years later, in 2001, when officials received a loan request for the cubist landmark, that the theft was noticed. Having searched the storerooms to no avail, they declared the painting, then valued at more than $2.5 million, stolen, the New York Times reports.



An unknown person going by “Robert" shipped the painting on December 17 from an address in Belgium to a climate-controlled warehouse in Long Island City. The package was labeled as “art craft," with a stated value of $37 and complete with a Christmas card. The next day, the painting arrived at the Port of Newark and was seized.



Federal Customs and Border Protection officials examined the FedEx shipment and found the missing Picasso. They notified the Department of Homeland Security, and officials working from Long Island City, Queens, then took over.



There's no information on whether anyone has been arrested in connection with the shipment and the identity of the package's recipient has not been released.



French museum officials came to New York in January to examine the painting in person. Comparing it with historical records and photographs of the missing work, they confirmed that it was indeed La Coiffeuse.



Anthony Scandiffio, the deputy special agent in charge of Homeland Security Investigations who seized the painting, said in a statement, “The market to sell stolen antiquities in the United States is drying up."



A number of recent thefts from European museums have shown that robberies are often inside jobs committed by employees with access to invaluable artworks, manuscripts, and artifacts. (see Librarian Steals Priceless Documents from Russian Museum also Prosecutor Asks for Five-Year Suspended Prison Sentence for Picasso's Electrician Pierre Le Guennec). However, many cases remain unsolved for years (see Unsolved Art Heists: The Missing Paintings of Vincent van Gogh).





---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

artnet News is the world’s first global, 24-hour art newswire, dedicated to informing, engaging, and connecting the most avid members of the art community with daily news and expert commentary.



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Scientists Create Music For Cats, And Fur A Good Reason

"Cats are not humans and humans are not cats and it is important that we humans, as the servants of cats, be aware of this difference."



That's Dr. Charles Snowdon, a psychologist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He's been on a quirky mission to--yes, you're reading this right--create music for cats.



You can listen to some of his "meow-sic" here.



"We were motivated to make music for cats for two reasons," he told The Huffington Post in an email. "First, many pet owners told us that they play radio music for their pets while they are at work and we wondered if this had any value. Second, we have developed a theory that suggests that species other than humans can enjoy music but that the music has to be in the frequency range that the species uses to communicate and with tempos that they would normally use."



To create the cat music, Snowdon and his colleagues tried to mimic natural cat sounds, using sliding notes and high pitches--cat calls tend to be an octave or more above human voices. The researchers based the tempo of the songs on purring and suckling sounds.



Then came the moment of truth: the researchers tested their compositions on 47 male and female domestic cats in their homes. The kitties heard "Cozmo's Air" and "Rusty's Ballad," along with two human music pieces for comparison: Gabriel Fauré's "Elegie" and Johann Sebastian Bach's "Air on a G String."



What happened? When the cat music was playing, the felines were significantly more likely to orient their heads toward it, walk toward it, and even rub up against the speaker.



"We interpret this as indicating that the cats showed a preference," Snowdon said in the email.



Now that the researchers have found music cats seem to like, they think it may have some important applications, like soothing stressed-out shelter cats.



"We think of cats as highly independent of their human servants, but there is some research showing that cats experience separation anxiety, which is greater in human-raised cats than in feral cats," he told Discovery News.



An article describing the research has been accepted for publication in the journal Applied Animal Behavioral Science.




Boise Bipolar Center, Charles K. Bunch, Ph.D, Boise Idaho Therapist Mental health photo 2168_zps680c452f.jpg

Should America go vegan to ward off obesity and save the environment?

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Nutrition / Diet News From Medical News Today

Should America go vegan to ward off obesity and save the environment?

Separate reports from the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine and Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee make the case for Americans to adopt a plant-based diet.



MedWorm: Binge Eating Disorder

Impact of using DSM‐5 criteria for diagnosing binge eating disorder in bariatric surgery candidates: Change in prevalence rate, demographic characteristics, and scores on the minnesota multiphasic personality inventory – 2 restructured form (MMPI‐2‐RF)

DiscussionAn additional 3.43% (p < .001) of bariatric surgery candidates met the diagnostic threshold for BED when using DSM‐5 criteria. These individuals were demographical similar and produced similar MMPI‐2‐RF and BES scores when compared with patients who met DSM‐IV‐TR criteria for BED. Thus, the current investigation indicates that individuals meeting BED criteria based on DSM‐5 are similar to those meeting the more conservative diagnostic threshold outlined in DSM‐IV‐TR in a sample of bariatric surgery candidates. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2014) (Source: International Journal of Eating Disorders)




Boise Bipolar Center, Charles K. Bunch, Ph.D, Boise Idaho Therapist Mental health photo 2168_zps680c452f.jpg

An Owl Is Now Attacking Pedestrians In The Netherlands, Too

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Weird News - The Huffington Post

An Owl Is Now Attacking Pedestrians In The Netherlands, Too

PURMEREND, Netherlands (AP) — The residents of one Dutch town are cowering under umbrellas after an aggressive eagle owl started swooping out of the sky, sinking its talons into them and gouging their flesh.



The so-called "terror owl" has become a media sensation after attacking people in recent weeks in and around Purmerend, 20 kilometers (12 miles) north of Amsterdam. The hardest hit area in town is the Prinsenstichting assisted-living complex for people with disabilities. A spokeswoman for the complex, Lieselotte de Bruijn, said Thursday the owl has attacked up to 20 people there in recent weeks, sometimes causing injuries that required stitches.



One Prinsenstichting resident who fell prey to the owl, Niels Verkooijen, told the Dutch news show Hart van Nederland that it was a painful experience.



"It was like having a brick laced with nails thrown at your head," he said.



The town is warning residents to steer clear of the bird, which is reported to be 60-to-75 centimeters (24-to-30 inches) tall. It has applied for a permit to catch the owl, which is a protected species. Officials suspect the "terror owl" was once kept in captivity, as they say such aggressive behavior is not known among wild eagle owls and the species is not commonly found in the region.



In the meantime, the town has advised residents not to approach the bird and to use umbrellas if they are walking in the evening, when the owl is most active. Marielle de Munnik of Rabobank said staff visited the Prinsenstichting complex this week to hand out dozens of umbrellas.



Bas van Gelderen, who works at Prinsenstichting, saw an owl attack a resident, gouging her cheek with its talons.



"(Now) when we go out at night, or when it's dark, we go out only with umbrellas," he said.



___



Mike Corder in The Hague contributed.




Boise Bipolar Center, Charles K. Bunch, Ph.D, Boise Idaho Therapist Mental health photo 2168_zps680c452f.jpg

Impact of using DSM‐5 criteria for diagnosing binge eating disorder in bariatric surgery candidates: Change in prevalence rate, demographic characteristics, and scores on the minnesota multiphasic personality inventory – 2 restructured form (MMPI‐2‐RF)

http://bit.ly/1369wVM

MedWorm: Binge Eating Disorder

Impact of using DSM‐5 criteria for diagnosing binge eating disorder in bariatric surgery candidates: Change in prevalence rate, demographic characteristics, and scores on the minnesota multiphasic personality inventory – 2 restructured form (MMPI‐2‐RF)

DiscussionAn additional 3.43% (p < .001) of bariatric surgery candidates met the diagnostic threshold for BED when using DSM‐5 criteria. These individuals were demographical similar and produced similar MMPI‐2‐RF and BES scores when compared with patients who met DSM‐IV‐TR criteria for BED. Thus, the current investigation indicates that individuals meeting BED criteria based on DSM‐5 are similar to those meeting the more conservative diagnostic threshold outlined in DSM‐IV‐TR in a sample of bariatric surgery candidates. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2014) (Source: International Journal of Eating Disorders)




Boise Bipolar Center, Charles K. Bunch, Ph.D, Boise Idaho Therapist Mental health photo 2168_zps680c452f.jpg

Surprising Racial Disparities Found In Flu Vaccine Rates

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Health and Fitness - The Huffington Post

Surprising Racial Disparities Found In Flu Vaccine Rates

This year's flu strain was particularly brutal, disproportionately affecting children and the elderly. A record-breaking rate of 217 of every 100,000 people over the age of 65 have been hospitalized for the flu, while 80 children so far have died from the disease, reports AP. And while flu season is officially in retreat as of Feb. 14, researchers are hoping to take lessons from this year that can be applied to the 2015-2016 season.



A small survey presented on Feb. 23 at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology in Houston illustrated one area of concern: racial disparities in flu vaccine rates. The survey, conducted in the suburbs around Detroit, found that black people are less likely to get vaccinated for the flu than either white or Asian people.



The survey data shed light on an opportunity to improve the communication around vaccines -- especially when it comes to dispelling myths about the injections in some communities, according to lead researcher Dr. Melissa Skupin of Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.



“There’s a lot of misinformation out there about vaccines in general, but particularly the flu vaccine,” said Skupin in a phone interview with The Huffington Post. “People don’t think it works, and when they don’t think it works, they’re less likely to get it.”



Skupin sent anonymous surveys to six outpatient clinics in the suburbs of Detroit in 2013. The survey asked patients whether they had received a flu vaccine the previous year. It also asked them about demographic information and their perceptions of the flu vaccine. She received 472 responses and found that 93 percent of people who identified as white had gotten a flu vaccine, 84 percent who identified as Asian got one, but only 62 percent of people who identified as black got one.







However, Skupin did find that a doctor’s recommendation could significantly influence a person’s decision to get vaccinated; 90 percent of people got the shot if their doctor recommended it, but only 58 percent of people did so if their doctors didn’t recommend it. Unsurprisingly, Skupin's survey also revealed that people who believed the flu vaccine would help them were more likely to get one (90 percent), as opposed to the people who got a flu vaccine despite not believing in their benefit (58 percent).



Skupin didn’t break down the different reasons people gave for not getting the flu vaccine by race, so she can’t say for sure why the racial disparity in vaccine rates exists in suburban Detroit. But doctor recommendations depend on trust and communication, and previous research has shown it can be notoriously lacking between medical professionals and some communities of color. As a result, people of color sometimes suffer the most when it comes to vaccine-preventable diseases like measles, as the 1989-1991 resurgence in the U.S. showed; Black, Native American and Latino children were three to sixteen times at greater risk for contracting measles than white children during that epidemic, according to a 2014 CDC report.



Skupin's survey wasn't nationally representative, but she hopes that her data inspire doctors to be more pro-active about recommending vaccines, as opposed to simply offering them to patients. “A lot of doctors do recommend the flu shot, but for some reason the message is not getting through to patients -- that we want them to get it, and that we think it’s beneficial to them,” said Skupin.



“Some of it may have to do with the approach -- saying, ‘Would you like the flu shot today?' as opposed to 'I recommend you get the flu shot, and here’s why,'" she suggested. "Maybe physicians should be a little bit more proactive and interactive with their patients on vaccines."



The flu affects an estimated five to 20 percent of all Americans and puts more than 200,000 in the hospital every year, according to estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The flu caused 3,697 deaths in 2013.



Health authorities recommend the flu vaccine to anyone over six months old. However, only about 45 percent of adults get vaccinated for the flu every year, according to CDC numbers from the 2011-2012 flu season. There is a silver lining, however. While there are disparities among different races, vaccine rates for all race groups have inched upward since 1989.



Skupin hopes that trend continues, as more people bring questions about vaccines to their doctors. "We want people to ask questions and bring in any concerns they have about vaccines, rather than just not getting vaccinated.”



Health News Headlines - Yahoo News

Sacked Sanofi boss joins PureTech board

Viehbacher gestures as he addresses a news conference in MumbaiChris Viehbacher, sacked as chief executive of French drugs firm Sanofi last year, is to join the board of PureTech, a privately owned healthcare science and technology R&D company. Boston-based PureTech's co-founder and senior partner Robert Langer said in a statement he had known the German-Canadian Viehbacher for many years "and I am very excited that we will be working together more closely now". Viehbacher, who moved to Boston last year while he was still running Sanofi, raised the French company's multinational profile during his six years in the job by completing over $30 billion of acquisitions including that of Boston-based Genzyme.




Soccer-2022 World Cup final no later than Dec. 18, says Blatter

(Adds details) By Mike Collett BELFAST, Feb 27 (Reuters) - The World Cup final in Qatar in 2022 should be played no later than Dec. 18, FIFA president Sepp Blatter said on Friday. Blatter, who arrived in Northern Ireland for this weekend's International Football Association Board (IFAB) meeting, said he would propose that idea to the FIFA executive committee when it meets next month. UEFA, European soccer's governing body, said this week that it wanted the World Cup to start on Nov. 26 and end on Dec. 23, two days before Christmas. "The World Cup will not go on until the 23rd, definitely not, we have to stop at the 18th," Blatter told reporters.



Good News - The Huffington Post

After Years Of Taking Questions, Obama Turns The Tables On One Teen

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama is making the switch from interviewee to interviewer.



The president questioned a Maryland high school senior in the My Brother's Keeper program. The interview for the StoryCorps oral history project was airing Friday on National Public Radio's "Morning Edition."



Noah McQueen discussed going from being in trouble with the law to being an award-winning student.



Obama asked McQueen how he softened after being a "knucklehead." McQueen said he became accountable for his actions.



"It wasn't until I decided to do better for myself, that I had to be held accountable for my actions, so I'm not the same person," McQueen said. "I'm not the same creature. Everything about me, and my being is different."



McQueen said as a black man, he feels pressure to always make the right decisions or be judged.





The president told McQueen he'll probably make more mistakes since he's only 18. But Obama said he's proud of McQueen.



"Well, look, listen. At the age of 18, I didn't know what I was going to be doing with my life," Obama said. "And you shouldn't feel like you can't make mistakes at this point. You're 18 years old, I promise you you're gonna make some more as you go along.



"But one of the things you've discovered is that you have this strength inside yourself," Obama continued. "And if you stay true to that voice that clearly knows what's right and what's wrong, sometimes you're going to mess up, but you can steer back and keep going."

The interview marks the first anniversary of Obama's initiative to help young minority men.





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